Health and Safety Statement

This Safety Statement outlines the safety policy of  The Clontarf Golf & Bowling Club

September 2020.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. INTRODUCTION 3
  2. GENERAL POLICY STATEMENT AND OBJECTIVES 3
  3. RESPONSIBILITIES OF EMPLOYER 5
  4. RESPONSIBILITIES OF EMPLOYEE 6
  5. RESPONSIBILITIES AND DUTIES OF A SAFETY REPRESENTATIVE 7
  6. PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE) / FIRST AID 8
  7. FIRST-AID, AED & ACCIDENT REPORTING 9

∙ First-Aid Boxes 9

∙ AED 9

∙ Accident Reporting 9

  1. SAFETY TRAINING 9
  2. CIRCULATION AND REVISION OF SAFETY STATEMENT 10
  3. FIRE EVACUATION PROCEDURE 11
  4. SMOKING POLICY 11
  5. GENERAL HAZARDS, RISKS & CONTROL MEASURES 12
  6. WORKING IN ISOLATION/WORKING ALONE 13
  7. WEATHER 13
  8. NOISE 14
  9. MANUAL HANDLING OF LOADS 14

∙ Factors to consider in manual lifting: 15

∙ Characteristics of the load 15

∙ Physical effort required 15

∙ Characteristics of the Working Environment 15

∙ Requirements of the Activity 15

∙ Personal Factors 15

  1. FIRE 19
  2. MACHINERY 20
  3. HAND-HELD TOOLS 22

∙ Prior to work commencing 22

∙ Hazards 22

∙ Control measures 22

∙ On-Course Driving / Driver & Passenger Safety 22

∙ When Operating Vehicles on Slopes 23

  1. INFECTIONS 23
  2. BUILDINGS AND FIXED EQUIPMENT 24
  3. ELECTRICITY ON THE COURSE 25
  4. CHEMICALS 27

24.LABELLING OF HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS 29

∙ Explosive: 29

∙ Oxidising: 30

∙ Highly Flammable 30

∙ Toxic or Very Toxic 30

∙ Corrosive 31

∙ Harmful 31

∙ Irritant 31

∙ Dangerous for the Environment 31

∙ Storage 32

∙ How to read a typical label: 32

  1. KITCHEN SAFETY 33

∙ Deep Fat Fryer Hazards 33

∙ Control Measures 33

∙ Dishwasher Hazards 33

∙ Control Measures 34

∙ Salamanders Hazards 34

∙ Control Measures 34

∙ Water Boilers Hazards 35

∙ Control Measures 35

∙ Bain Maries Hazards 35

∙ Control Measures 36

∙ Ranges /Cookers   Hazards 36

∙ Control Measures 37

 

1. INTRODUCTION

The Safety, Health and Welfare at Work Act, 2005 deals with the protection of the safety, health and welfare of all persons at work.  The Act requires that every employer shall prepare in writing, a statement, to be known as a Safety Statement.  The Safety Statement should specify the manner in which the safety, health and welfare of persons employed by an employer shall be secured at work.

This Safety Statement outlines the safety policy of The Clontarf Golf Club and Bowling Club as it applies to the work practices of its employees, members and visitors.

The objective of the Club’s safety policy is to endeavour to provide a safe and healthy work environment for employees of the Club.  The success of the policy critically depends on the co-operation of each of its employees.  It does not and cannot claim to cover every eventuality. It will be reviewed on an ongoing basis in the light of experience, and any suggestion on its improvement should be forwarded to the General Manager.

Pat Murray 

General Manager   – August 2020

 

2. GENERAL POLICY STATEMENT AND OBJECTIVES

The Club as employer shall ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, the safety, health and welfare of its employees and, in achieving this objective, shall comply fully with all relevant legislation. In pursuance of this policy, the Club strives, inter alia, to ensure a safe, healthy working environment; to ensure that plant and machinery are properly maintained in accordance with manufacturers’ recommendations and that adequate training is provided in the use of equipment, where this is appropriate to ensure safe operation.

 

The General Manager has responsibility for ensuring the safety and health of staff working in the Club and for ensuring, where he perceives that there are risks or where risks have been brought to his notice, that he eliminates these in so far as this is reasonably practicable and within his competence and, where this is outside his competence, to report the matter to the Management Committee. He will also report all major incidents to the Management Committee.

 

To implement fully the requirements of the Safety, Health and Welfare at Work Act, 2005 the full co-operation of employees, members and visitors is needed.  It is the duty of every employee, member and visitors of the Club to co-operate with management at all levels in ensuring the safety, health and welfare of himself/herself and his/her colleagues in the discharge of official duties.  In particular, each employee is expected to adopt a safety conscious attitude to his/her work, to be familiar with and to respect any general or local instructions in this regard and to report any dangers or potential dangers for attention in accordance with the arrangements set out in this Safety Statement.

 

For its part, the Club will, so far as is reasonably practicable to do so, carry out the following:

  • maintain all places of work under its control in a condition that is safe and without risk to health and provide and maintain means of access and egress from them that are safe.
  • provide, operate and maintain buildings, plant machinery and work systems, that are safe and without risk to health.
  • provide and maintain a working environment for employees that is safe, without  risks to health, and adequate as regards facilities for their welfare at work.
  • provide such information, instruction, training and supervision as is necessary to ensure the safety, health and welfare of its employees at work.
  • provide such protective clothing and equipment as may be necessary and appropriate where hazards cannot be eliminated.
  • make arrangements for ensuring safety and absence of risks to health in connection with the use, handling, storage and transport of articles and substances.
  • prepare, and revise as necessary, adequate plans to be followed in emergencies.
  • undertake to ensure that persons who are carrying out work, and who are not employees, do not expose Club employees to risks to their safety and health and are not themselves similarly exposed.
  • revise this Safety Statement according as circumstances dictate to ensure that it is relevant at all times to the safety, health and welfare of employees.
  • ensure that this Safety Statement is brought to the attention of employees and other people who might be affected by it
  • provide, so far as is reasonably practicable, adequate resources in terms of time, people and finance to secure the safety, health and welfare of employees and also provide for and facilitate the Safety Representative in the course of his/her duties.

 

A Safety Representative may be appointed by the Club’s employees (See Section 5)

 

Signed:

————————————-   Pat Murray

                     General Manager

Date:

 

Approved  by the Management Committee on 18th August 2020 and Minuted.

 

3. RESPONSIBILITIES OF EMPLOYER

The General Manager or the area supervisor is responsible for ensuring that the objectives set down under the General Policy Statement are met (Section 2.0 refers).

The General Manager must ensure that:

  • employees are fully aware of the possible hazards in their area of  work.
  • employees receive proper information and training. Each employee must be instructed in the performance of his/her duties and informed of the associated hazards and risks, and of the procedures to be followed in the case of accidents, fire or other emergencies.
  • safe systems of work are used.
  • premises and equipment are properly maintained. The General Manager should ensure, as far as reasonably practicable, that all equipment meets appropriate safety standard specifications and that unsafe equipment is either made safe or taken out of use. The Safety, Health and Welfare at Work Act, 2005 requires that “any person who designs, manufactures, imports or supplies any article for use at work, to ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, that the machine is designed, constructed, tested and examined so as to be safe and without risk to health when used by a person at a place at work”.  The Act also requires that the person supplied with the article is provided with adequate information on how to use it properly.  This section also applies to second-hand equipment which must be upgraded, so far as is reasonably practicable, to conform to the latest developments in improved machinery safety.
  • dangerous substances and equipment are kept in secure storage.
  • risk assessment of hazards to safety and health are made and adequate control measures adopted.
  • management of safety and health is properly integrated into the overall planning of all work projects.
  • suitable provisions are made for emergencies
  • thorough and prompt investigations are carried out of all accidents and “near-miss”  incidents involving Club employees/visitors that occur.
  • The requirement to complete the HSA forms is separate from this Club’s current internal accident reporting procedures which continue to operate independently. In the event of any accident, a detailed written report together with the Club’s accident report form should be completed and forwarded to the General Manager for attention.
  • copies of the Safety Statement,  manuals, procedures and instructions are maintained and  brought to the attention of the employees to include adequate notices of safety issues.

4. RESPONSIBILITIES OF EMPLOYEE

 

Employees have legal duties and responsibilities as laid down under the Safety, Health and Welfare at Work Act, 2005.

 

It is the duty of every employee while at work to take reasonable care of his/her own safety, health and welfare and that of any other person who may be affected by his/her acts or omission while at work.

 

It is  the duty of every employee while at work to co-operate with his/her employer and any other person to such extent as would enable his/her employer or the other person to comply with any of the relevant statutory provisions.

 

It is  the duty of every employee to use in such a manner and so as to provide the protection intended, any suitable appliance, protective clothing, convenience, equipment or other means provided (whether for his/her use alone or for use by him /her in common with others) for securing his/her safety, health or welfare. These items should be maintained in good condition and defects noticed should be brought to the immediate attention of the General Manager.

 

It is the duty of every employee to report in writing to the General Manager, without unreasonable delay, any accidents or “near miss” incidents, defects in plant, equipment, place of work or system of work which might endanger safety, health and welfare, of which he/she becomes aware.

 

It is the duty of every employee to avoid acting in a manner that could in any way contribute to increasing the risk of injury or disability to himself/herself or others.

 

It is  the duty of every employee to report to the General Manager if he/she considers that he/she has insufficient training or experience to carry out the duties allocated to him/her with a reasonable degree of safety to himself/herself and others who may be affected by his/her actions.

 

No employee shall intentionally or recklessly interfere with or misuse any appliance, protective clothing, equipment or other means provided in pursuance of any of the relevant statutory provisions or otherwise for securing the safety, health or welfare of persons arising out of work activities.

 

5. RESPONSIBILITIES AND DUTIES OF A SAFETY REPRESENTATIVE

 

The Act provides for the selection and appointment, by employees, of a Safety Representative in a place of work, who will have the right to represent them in consultation with the employer and to obtain from the employer any necessary information to ensure the safety and health of employees.

 

The Safety Representative may consult with, and make representations, to the General Manager on safety, health and welfare matters relating to the employees in the work place, for the purpose of preventing accidents and ill-health, to highlight problems and to identify means of overcoming problems. Such consultations will be particularly important when changes are taking place e.g. introducing new machinery or work processes.

 

The Safety Representative may investigate accidents, dangerous occurrences or “near miss” incidents in the work place to find out the causes and help to identify any remedial or preventative measures necessary. However, the Safety Representative must not interfere with anything at the scene of the incident nor can the Safety Representative obstruct any person with statutory obligations from doing anything required of them.

 

The Safety Representative is entitled to consult a HSA Inspector, either orally or in writing and to receive advice and information from HSA Inspectors in matters of safety, health and welfare at work.

 

The Safety Representative may carry out with prior notice to the General Manager, inspections in the place of work to identify hazards and risks to safety and health.  Such inspections may take the form of a safety tour, safety sampling, or safety surveys, used separately or in any combination. The frequency of, and personnel attending such inspections, should be agreed with the General Manager.

 

The General Manager will advise the Safety Representative, if practicable, when a HSA Inspector arrives to carry out an inspection. The Safety Representative may accompany the HSA Inspector during an inspection but not when the HSA Inspector is investigating an accident.

 

The Safety Representative should maintain records of any safety, health or welfare matters found to be unsatisfactory, whether discovered during an inspection or not. Inspections made when nothing was found amiss should be recorded.

 

The Safety Representative will be afforded reasonable time-off in order to allow him/her to acquire the knowledge necessary to discharge his/her functions as Safety Representative and to discharge his/her functions as a Safety Representative.

 

Further information on the role of the Safety Representative is contained in the “Guidelines on Safety Consultation and Safety Representative” published by the HSA.

 

6. PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE) / FIRST AID

 

This Club is committed to a policy of ensuring that the necessary Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and First Aid equipment is provided which, combined with the safe work practices espoused in this Safety Statement, will make a positive contribution to a safer working environment for its employees. Employees are advised of the recommended PPE and First Aid equipment available and of the work activities where it must be worn/available.

 

7.  FIRST-AID, AED & ACCIDENT REPORTING

 

First-aid means treating minor injuries at work and giving immediate attention to more serious casualties until medical help is available. It can save lives and prevent minor injuries becoming major ones.

 

Reporting accidents and ill health at work is a legal requirement. The enforcing authorities use the information to see the ‘big picture’ of where injuries, ill health and accidental losses are occurring, and to advise on preventive action.

  • First-Aid Boxes

There are 5 suitably stocked first-aid boxes, located in:

 

The Bar – The Greenkeeper’s Cabin – Reception – Staff Room (downstairs) & The Kitchen

 

All employees are urged to report any deficiency in the contents of the first-aid box in their area and report it to the Jim Byrne or General Manager, who will replenish it.

  • AED

An Automated External Defibrillator is available in an alarmed highly visible cabinet at reception. Its use is to increase the chance of saving the life of a person suffering a sudden cardiac arrest. There are twelve staff responders trained in CPR and how to use the AED. Our protocols for ADR as set down should be followed.

  • Accident Reporting

An accident book is maintained by the General Manager and all accidents are documented.  Near misses should also be reported so that action will be taken to eliminate or minimise the risk.

8. SAFETY TRAINING

 

The Club is committed to a policy of providing ongoing necessary training to its employees on matters relating to safety and health.  However, such training will only be provided on the basis of identifying priorities and within the budgetary resources available and are help annually by the relevant managers.

 

It is essential that the General Manager provides on-going training/instruction on safe work practices. If a new employee commences work, the General Manager should take the earliest available opportunity to discuss the Safety Statement with the entrant, to ensure that the contents and implications are fully understood.

 

If there are specific training requirements in the area of safety and health which the General Manager believes is required, for example, instruction in lifting and handling techniques, such training should be provided.

 

9. CIRCULATION AND REVISION OF SAFETY STATEMENT

 

All employees must ensure that they read, thoroughly understand and comply with relevant instructions, codes of practice and other advice that are issued by their employer for the protection of safety and health at the place of work.  Any employee who is not sure of his/her responsibilities or is in doubt as to the safety and health aspect of any operation should consult the General Manager.

 

This Safety Statement is made available to all employees.  All those covered by this Safety Statement are required to verify that they have seen and noted its contents.  This Statement must be brought to the attention of all new employees and to those staff temporarily recruited.

 

The Club is committed to ensuring that the Safety Statement is revised, according as circumstances dictate, to ensure that it is relevant at all times to the safety, health and welfare of employees.

 









 

 

 

 

 

 

10. FIRE EVACUATION PROCEDURE

 

Procedures apply to all staff, members and other visitors to the Clubhouse area.  There are no exceptions. Procedures apply to all evacuations whether a real incident, a drill or a false alarm.

 

If you discover a fire, sound the alarm immediately by breaking the glass in the nearest fire alarm point. Staff must familiarise themselves with the location of these points.

 

Attack the fire with available appliances only if this presents no risk.

 

Staff, members and other visitors to the Clubhouse area must leave the building immediately by the nearest fire exit.  Staff must familiarise themselves with these exits and with escape routes.

 

Staff must assist disabled people.

 

Staff, members and other visitors to the Clubhouse area must not stop to collect belongings.

 

Staff must not stop to shut down computer equipment.

 

Staff must close doors behind them.

 

Fire Wardens should try to sweep through the public areas, such as, restaurant, bar, locker-rooms, office spaces and toilets as they leave so long as this presents no risk.

 

Staff, members and other visitors to the Clubhouse area must congregate at the designated assembly point in the car park. Staff must familiarise themselves with its location.

 

Staff, members and other visitors to the Clubhouse area must not congregate in front of the building.

 

Staff, members and other visitors to the Clubhouse area must not seek to leave the site during an evacuation.

 

Staff, members and other visitors to the Clubhouse area must not attempt to re-enter the building until the all clear has been given by the responsible person in charge.

 

11. SMOKING POLICY

The Clontarf Golf Club and Bowling Club recognises the harmful effects of smoking and promotes a smoke-free environment. Smoking (including E Cigarettes) is therefore prohibited throughout The Clontarf Golf Club and Bowling Club clubhouse and other enclosed workplaces. All staff, members and other visitors who use the facilities of The Clontarf Golf Club and Bowling Club must comply with this policy which is in accordance with S.I. No. 481 of 2003, Tobacco Smoking (Prohibition) Regulation, 2003, which came into effect on March 29th 2004.

12. GENERAL HAZARDS, RISKS & CONTROL MEASURES

The Safety, Health and Welfare at Work Act, 2005 requires that the Safety Statement be based on “an identification of hazards and an assessment of the risks to safety and health at the place of work to which the Safety Statement relates.” A hazard can be defined as any substance, article, material or practice which has the potential to cause harm to safety, health or welfare, damage to property, damage to the environment or any combination of these.

 

When potential hazards have been identified, the risks associated with them should be assessed, taking into account the severity of the consequences and the possible frequency of the hazard concerned. Wherever possible and if reasonably practicable, risks should be eliminated and designed out of the workplace or reduced to an acceptable level by control measures and resources to safeguard safety and health.

 

Control measures should be allocated first to those hazards having the potential on exposure to same, of severe consequences and possible multiple persons affected. The  purpose of a risk assessment is to prioritise the allocation of resources for their control. However, no risk should be ignored.

The Safety, Health and Welfare at Work (Chemical Agents) Regulation, 2001 defines a chemical agent and outlines the duties of employers in relation to the prevention and limitation of exposure of employees to chemical agents at the place of work.  This  Regulation outlines requirements in relation to information, training and consultation.  A copy of the Regulation is available on written request from the Safety and Health Policy Section.

Exposure to chemical agents, albeit in containers, is an everyday hazard for course staff.  The Course Superintendent shall “fully familiarises himself with the provisions of the (Chemical Agent) Regulations 1994 so as to be in a position to advise as to the possible safety and health implications for course staff.”  Where required, the appropriate recommended personal protective equipment should be used, for example, in locations which have or are being sprayed with herbicides, pesticides, etc. For further information on chemicals see Section 23.

 

13. WORKING IN ISOLATION/WORKING ALONE

Course staff may often work alone or work in isolation while on course activities.

Hazard
  • Working in isolation/working alone. (Lone Working Policy issued to staff)
Risk
  • Assistance may not be available in the case of illness or injury. The consequence of being immobilised due to injury or illness could be extremely serious particularly if such should occur in a remote location or during inclement weather.
Control

Measures

  • Ensure that you inform contact person of work plan and expected time of return.
  • Appropriate Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) should be worn and necessary protective equipment carried.

14. WEATHER

Course staff are exposed to a wide variety of weather conditions which may pose various risks.

Hazard
  • Extreme weather conditions. Interference with safe working conditions. Ground conditions rendered insecure by rain, frost, snow, etc. Possibility of falling trees in windy conditions or during lightning storms. Vision and/or hearing impeded by weather.
Risk
  • Minor/major or fatal injury if course staff, due to weather conditions, becomes disorientated, are hit by falling tree/branches, falls/slips – they may, if injured, be unable to make contact.
  • Illness. Cold and wet weather may in the short-term lead to colds, flu and respiratory illness, and in the longer term, chronic illness, such as rheumatism and related conditions. Dry weather may also lead to respiratory conditions arising from dust and pollen. Sunburn and sunstroke are risks in hot sunny weather.
Control

Measures

  • Unnecessary and prolonged exposure to extreme weather conditions is detrimental to health and should be avoided.
  • Due attention should be paid to weather forecasts.
  • Appropriate PPE (weatherproof clothing) should be worn and necessary protective equipment carried.
  • Ensure that you inform contact person of work load and expected time of return.

15. NOISE

There are legal requirements as set out in the European Communities (Protection of Workers – Exposure to Noise) Regulations, 1990 (S.I. No. 157 of 1990) regarding the noise levels to which persons may be exposed, and action to be taken to monitor and control noise at the place of work, which must be observed.

A rule of thumb is that if continuous loud noise is such that it requires that you must shout in order to communicate at a distance of two metres, then it is probably above the legal limits regarding exposure. While course staff may not be exposed for long periods to high levels of noise, the following risks and control measures are outlined for guidance purposes.

Hazard
  • Continuous loud noise.
Risk
  • Possible headaches, loss of concentration or damage to hearing if exposed to continuous loud noise.
  • Interference with verbal communication leading to misinterpretation of instructions or warnings.
  • Drowning out warning sounds, e.g. alarm signals, approaching traffic.
Control 

Measures

  • Time spent in noisy areas should be minimised.
  • Hearing protectors should be used against any noise that seriously interferes with one’s comfort, safety, or work performance.

16. MANUAL HANDLING OF LOADS

There is increasing frequency of workers suffering from back problems caused at work.  With the Safety, Health and Welfare at Work Act, 2005, cognisance must be taken of the hazards involved e.g. manual lifting. The Safety, Health and Welfare at Work (General Application) Regulations, 1993 (SI No. 44 of 1993).  Part IV sets out the specific requirements in relation to manual handling of loads.

 

The small joints in the back are especially prone to wear and tear. Bad manual handling of loads gradually irritates and wears out the surface between them, which causes the back to stiffen up. When manual handling, ask yourself if you really have to do the handling?  If so, are you fit to carry out the task?  If the load is too heavy can it be divided into smaller loads?  Are you working from a safe position and is the load stable?  Some injuries are caused by trying to move excessive weight but many are due to the failure to use the correct method.

 

  • Factors to consider in manual lifting:


  • Characteristics of the load

 

The manual handling of a load may present a risk, particularly of back injury if it is:

  • Too heavy or too large.
  • Unwieldy or difficult to grasp.
  • Unstable or has contents likely to shift.
  • Positioned in a manner requiring it to be held or manipulated at a distance from the trunk, or with a bending or twisting of the trunk, or likely, because of its contours or consistency (or both) to result in injury to employees, particularly in the event of a collision.

 

  • Physical effort required

 

A physical effort may present a risk particularly of back injury if it is:

  • Too strenuous.
  • Only achieved by a twisting movement of the trunk.
  • Likely to result in a sudden movement of the load.
  • Made with the body in an unstable posture.

 

  • Characteristics of the Working Environment

 

The characteristics of the work environment may increase a risk, particularly of back injury if:

  • There is not enough room, in particular vertically, to carry out the activity.
  • The floor is uneven, thus presenting tripping hazards, or is slippery in relation to the employee’s footwear.
  • The place of work or the working environment prevents the handling of loads at a safe height or with a good posture by the employee.
  • Requirements of the Activity

 

The activity may present a risk, particularly of back injury, if it entails one or more of the following requirements:

  • Over-frequent or over-prolonged physical effort involving in particular the spine.
  • An insufficient bodily rest or recovery period.
  • Excessive lifting, lowering or carrying distances.
  • Personal Factors

The employee may be at risk if he/she:

  • Is physically unsuited to carry out the task in question.
  • Is wearing unsuitable clothing, footwear or other personal effects.
  • Does not have adequate or appropriate knowledge or training.

 

1. Stop and think.  Plan the lift.  Where is the load going to be placed?  Use appropriate handling aids if possible.  Do you need help with the load?  Remove obstructions such as discarded wrapping materials.  For a long lift – such as floor to shoulder height – consider resting the load mid-way on a table or bench in order to change grip.
2. Place the feet.  Feet apart, giving a balanced and stable base for lifting, leaning as far forward as is comfortable.3. Adopt a good posture.   Bend the knees so that the hands when grasping the load are as nearly level with the waist as possible.  But do not kneel or overflex the knees.  Keep the back straight (tucking in the chin helps).  Lean forward a little over the load if necessary to get a good grip.  Keep shoulders level and facing in the same direction as the hips.
4. Get a firm grip.  Try to keep the arms within the boundary formed by the legs.  The optimum position and nature of the grip depends on the circumstances and individual preference, but it must be secure.  If it is necessary to vary the grip as the lift proceeds, do this as smoothly as possible.
5. Don’t jerk.  Carry out the lifting movement smoothly, keeping control of the load.
5. Move the feet.  Don’t twist the trunk when turning to the side.

6. Keep close to the load.  Keep the load close to the trunk for as long as possible.  Keep the heaviest side of the load next to the trunk.  If a close approach to the load is not possible try sliding it towards you before attempting to lift it.

7. Put down, then adjust.  If precise positioning of the load is necessary, put it down first, the slide it into the desired position.

 

Hazard
  • Manual handling of loads; includes putting down, pushing, pulling, carrying or moving a load.
Risk
  • Minor/major injuries to include ruptures, strains and back injuries.
Control 

Measures

  • Avoid injury when lifting by remembering the following key points
  • size up the load,
  • bend the knees,
  • establish broad base,
  • correct grip,
  • keep straight back,
  • keep load close to body,
  • keep arms at side,
  • use body momentum.
  • If a load is too heavy, or you are in doubt as to the weight, do not lift.  If possible, either reduce the weight or get assistance.
  • Provision of appropriate training, as necessary for staff involved in manual handling.

 

17. FIRE

Section 18(2) of the Fire Services Act, 1981 states;

“it shall be the duty of every person having control over premises to which this Section applies to take all reasonable measures to guard against the outbreak of fire on such premises, and to ensure as far as is reasonably practicable the safety of persons on the premises in the event of an outbreak of fire.”

 

Fire or combustion is normally the result of fuel, oxygen and an initial source of heat combining in suitable quantities. The consumption of a material by fire is a chemical reaction in which a heated substance is combined with oxygen.  Heat, light, smoke and toxic gases are produced. There are many combustible substances in a golf club environment e.g. wood, diesel, fuel oil, agri-chemicals etc. and equally, there are any number of sources of ignition e.g. electrical faults, overheated machinery, heaters, machine exhausts, etc.

Hazard
  • Working in proximity to combustible material.
Risk
  • Personal injury (burns, shock, asphyxiation, etc.) or possible fatal injury in the event of fire.
Control 

Measures

  • Ensure there is no source of ignition, i.e. no person smoking, no machinery in operation, no heaters on, etc. when working in or close to areas which have combustible materials.
  • The action which is appropriate on discovering a fire will depend on how far the fire has developed and how quickly it is likely to spread.  Many fires are discovered in their early stages and can be brought under control by prompt action. If you discover a fire, raise the alarm/call the fire brigade, evacuate the building/vicinity but check if possible to see that everyone else has evacuated the building/vicinity and only, if safe to do so, should fire fighting be attempted. The importance of first raising the alarm cannot be over emphasised.
  • When working in buildings, or in confined areas, course staff should acquaint themselves with the location of fire-fighting equipment and of exits and fire escapes.
  • course staff should observe fire regulations and co-operate with Club officials, etc. in observing safety measures, evacuation procedures and alarms.

 

18. MACHINERY 

 

Course machinery is responsible for 30% of all golf club accidents (Source: Teagasc Survey 1992).  Awareness of these hazards by course staff will reduce the risk.

 

It is important to maintain a high standard of personal hygiene particularly when working in ditches or drains. Ensure that all cuts and abrasions are covered with waterproof dressings before and during work. Always wash hands before eating, drinking or smoking. The appropriate Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) should be worn. Cleanliness of clothing is also important because of the possibility of contracting or transmitting disease.

 

Hazard Risk Control Measures
Machine or other course machinery working in vicinity of course staff carrying out duties.

If an operating machine or other course machinery is approached from the rear,  the driver/operator may not be aware of the presence of course staff.

Possible minor/major or even fatal injury if struck by moving machinery.
  • Ensure safe working distances from all operating machinery/vehicles.
  • Keep the operating machinery/vehicle in view at all times.
  • Always  make driver/operator aware of your presence.
  • Where pedestrian areas, pathways and doorways are provided, these should be used.
  • Where possible avoid standing behind or near stationery machinery/ vehicles.
  • Be on the alert for vehicles emerging suddenly from around blind corners, or through gates or doorways.
Travelling with the driver in the cab or on drawbar. Minor/major or even fatal injury should you for whatever reason fall off/under the machine.
  • Do NOT travel on a machine being driven by somebody else.
Unguarded shafts, pulleys, belts or chains. Movement of machinery parts consists basically of rotary, sliding or reciprocating motion or a combination of these. These movements may cause injury by puncture, impact or crushing which could result in minor/major or even fatal injury, for example, possibility of getting entangled in the belts.
  • Ensure safe working distances from all operating machinery/vehicles.
  • Keep away from  machinery/vehicles particularly if there is a danger of getting entangled or of flying parts e.g. rotary mower.
  • Always make driver/operator aware of your presence.
  • Ensure that loose fitting clothing does not come in contact with moving machinery/machine parts.
Assisting an operator to rectify a malfunctioning machine while it is still operating  e.g. blockage at a blade. Risk of becoming entangled in the machine resulting in minor/major injury(loss of limb) or even fatal injury.
  • Do NOT assist an operator to rectify a malfunction, particularly when the machine is still operating.
Placing a finger over an oil leak in a pressurised hydraulic hose pipe. The pressure is so great that oil will penetrate the skin and can enter the blood system. Pressurised hydraulic oil can easily cause the loss of a hand or a limb due to gangrene, if oil comes in contact with the skin.
  • NEVER place a finger over any leak in the hydraulic hose or coupling, no matter how small.
  • NEVER touch or rub an oil-damp patch on a hydraulic hose. This could precipitate a sudden high pressure leak.

 

19. HAND-HELD TOOLS

Among the more dangerous hand tools used by course staff are the chain-saw and strimmer.

  • Prior to work commencing
  • Operator must be conversant in use of the equipment to be used
  • Machinery must be in proper repair and working order before commencing work
  • Must have PPE i.e. safety footwear, facemask or goggles, head protection, hearing protection, gloves, appropriate outdoor clothing
  • Hazards

  • Injury to feet and legs
  • Ejection of debris from machinery while cutting
  • Slips and trips due to uneven or slippery ground
  • Manual handling of equipment
  • Noise from machinery operations
  • Other persons in the vicinity of the work area, e.g. passers-by
  • Control measures

    • Ensure guards on machinery in place and effective for protection
    • Ensure that working area is clear of debris before starting operations
    • Always wear protective clothing and PPE
    • Take extra care on uneven and/or sloping ground
    • Use appropriate manual handling skills for moving equipment
  • On-Course Driving / Driver & Passenger Safety

Course vehicles, while basically stable, can over-turn if they are unbalanced due to overloading, rough handling or are allowed to get out of control on sloping or rough ground.  Please observe the following:

  • concentrate on what you are doing – don’t let your thoughts wonder
  • use the minimum speed necessary especially when turning
  • allow plenty of room for turning near banks and ditches
  • stop the engine and apply the foot brake fully before disembarking
  • do not disembark when vehicle is in motion – even if only travelling at slow speed
  • report any malfunction to the Course Superintendent immediately
  • do not carry more than the maximum number of persons allowed on the vehicle
  • When Operating Vehicles on Slopes

  • remember that the wheel grip decreases in wet weather
  • drive straight down and up steep slopes
  • turn up hill, when possible, after driving across a slope
  • keep wheel turned inwards against the slope when parking

20. INFECTIONS

Water hazards are designed as part of a golf course but to course staff they present a risk of picking up infections.  Water hazards may be ditches, drains, culverts, ponds, and slow-flowing rivers and course staff need to maintain these as much as the fairways and greens.

Weil’s Disease (leptospirosis) is the most common risk and is usually picked up from rats’ urine.  The bacteria which cause leptospirosis can get into the body through cuts and scratches and through the lining of the mouth, throat and eyes.

 

Symptoms are a flu-like illness with fever, chills, a persistent and severe headache, and muscle pains, especially in the legs.  It can be treated with antibiotics, but since most people have a mild illness and recover within a few weeks without treatment, it often goes undiagnosed.   A small number of people can have a more serious illness with jaundice and kidney failure and can be fatal in a very small number of cases.

Hazard Risk Control Measures
Working in water courses and surrounding areas. Contamination of water by animals. Appropriate Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) should be worn, particularly rubber gloves and wellington boots.

Wash hands thoroughly before eating.

If you have a cut or scratch, ensure it is covered by a waterproof plaster and cuts or abrasions received during activities should be thoroughly cleaned.

All Staff must observe Covid-19 guidelines at all times.

 

21. BUILDINGS AND FIXED EQUIPMENT

 

Trips, slips and falls in golf club compounds account for 23% of all course accidents (Source: Teagasc Survey 1992). When walking in the vicinity of course buildings,  course staff should be vigilant for hazards such as swinging doors and gates, unguarded manhole covers, loose objects that perhaps may fall, etc.

 

It is important for course staff to maintain a high standard of personal hygiene since they work in areas which may have been contaminated by animals – hares, rabbits, rats, etc. Ensure that all cuts and abrasions are covered with waterproof dressings before and during work. Always wash hands before eating, drinking or smoking. The appropriate PPE should be worn.

 

Hazard Risk Control Measures
Protruding nails in plank, sharp objects, etc. Minor/major injury.

Possible Tetanus infection.

Tetanus (lockjaw) is caused by the bacteria clostridia, the spores of which can live in the ground and decomposing material. Manure in particular, may contain high levels of spores. The organism enters the body through wounds.

  • Proceed with caution at all times and pay particular attention to your immediate surroundings.
  • Appropriate PPE should be worn.
Items which are at an awkward angle for course staff, e.g. sleepers, stakes, steel-poles, etc. Danger of slipping or falling when checking details in new course work leading to minor/major or even fatal injury.
  • Have appropriate equipment to facilitate work in such circumstances.
  • Appropriate PPE should be worn (protective steel-toe cap shoes, safety helmet, etc).
Cluttered and untidy compound and course buildings. Minor/major injury from falls, trips or bumping against sharp pointed objects.
  • Proceed with caution at all times and take care in these surroundings.
  • Watch out for sharp objects or edges and tripping hazards.
Inadequate natural light Possible minor/major injury from bumping into /tripping over items in dimly lit conditions.
  • Proceed with caution at all times and pay particular attention to your immediate surroundings.
  • All work areas should be lit by natural and/or artificial sources to level required for the intended activity.
Working in proximity to combustible substances e.g. fuel oil, heaters, infra red lamps, etc. Possibility of minor/major injury (burns) or even fatal injury.
  • Avoid working near unprotected heaters, etc.

 

  • Ensure that there is no source of ignition i.e. no person smoking or machinery in operation when working in or close to areas which have combustible material.

 

22. ELECTRICITY ON THE COURSE  

 

There have been a number of course fatalities due to electricity because some electrical fittings and/or equipment on courses are unsuitable or poorly maintained.  Electrical installations and equipment on courses must comply with the Safety, Health and Welfare (General Application) Regulations, 1993 (S.I. No. 44 of 1993).

 

When working in the presence of electrical fittings, it is important to observe that wires and installations appear to be in sound condition and that naked wires are not exposed. Electrical equipment should be suitably identified and marked and it should bear the manufacturers’ name and its electrical rating.

 

Course staff should not interfere with electrical equipment except in cases where it is necessary as part of their duties, in an emergency or where a facility is provided for general use or for the specific use of Club personnel.  Water hoses must never be directed at electrical installations, e.g. in the case of fire.

 

The electrical hazards listed below and overleaf are examples of situations which may be encountered by course staff.

 

Hazard Risk Control Measures
Damaged or worn cables,  taped joints or loose electric cables in sheds, yards, etc. Minor/major (electric shock, falls) or fatal injury (electrocution).
  • NEVER touch worn or temporary taped cables.
  • Report such defects immediately.
  • Watch out for loose cables and proceed with caution at all times.
Unsuitable domestic type plugs used in compound or connections to plugs with exposed wires, inadequate earthing, overloaded distribution boards, etc. Minor/major (electric shock) or fatal injury (electrocution).
  • NEVER touch exposed wires. Industrial type plugs and sockets (coloured blue for 220 volt) should be used.
Portable equipment including drills, welding gear, etc. Minor/major (electric shock) or fatal injury (electrocution).
  • Be careful in contact with electrical equipment. Where possible, a Residual Current Device (RCD) should be fitted to all electrical circuits for safety.
Overhead cables crossing the path of vehicular traffic. Minor/major (electric shock) or fatal injury (electrocution).
  • Do NOT travel on machine/other course machinery being driven by somebody else. Good machine operators NEVER carry passengers.
  • If driving/being carried on a vehicle,  take note of the height of overhead cables to and from the compound and whether there is adequate clearance for high vehicles and loads travelling beneath them.

 

23. CHEMICALS

 

The variety of chemicals available to course staff continues to rise as green-keeping practices change and new grass treatment systems evolve.  In general chemicals  must all be considered potentially dangerous to man. When using any pesticide product it is important to read the label fully and strictly adhere to the safety precautions outlined on the label.

 

Personal exposure to chemicals may possibly lead to acute chronic toxicity via exposure route;

  • through the nose and lungs i.e. by breathing contaminated air,
  • through the mouth i.e. by ingestion, e.g. if you touch your mouth after you have been         handling chemicals or swallow accidentally;
  • by skin contact even when there are no wounds or scratches, as some chemicals can pass straight through the skin.

 

The risks could include:

  • eye irritation, possible permanent damage to vision,
  • injury to lungs and respiratory tract,
  • skin irritation, dermatitis.

 

By whatever route chemicals get into the body, they then pass into the blood stream which can carry them to the liver, kidney, brain and nervous system and cause damage. Health problems may not occur immediately.  More often harmful chemicals affect your health without you being aware of it. Indeed, sometimes the damage may not appear for years, long after you have stopped handling the chemical.

 

The control measures when handling/coming into contact with harmful chemical agents are as follows;

  • The hazards associated with toxic materials must be communicated effectively to the user as follows:- (i) training and instruction, (ii) the Safety Hazard Data Sheet for the material,  (iii) the hazard warning label attached to the chemical container.
  • Current Safety Hazard Data Sheets should be obtained for chemicals in use or to which you are exposed while on course activities. Details of necessary precautions and dangers must be observed.
  • Strict hygiene must be observed in the presence of all toxic materials.
  • Appropriate PPE should be worn when required, to protect against contamination/ poisoning.
  • Chemicals should be stored and transported in a suitable container which is clearly labelled.
  • Be on the lookout for hazard warning signs which may indicate if chemicals are being used.

HSA leaflets titled “Use Chemicals Safely”, “CHEMWISE”, “Occupational Asthma” and “Guidance Notes on Prevention of Dermatitis” are available from the Safety and Health Authority.

Hazard  Risk Control Measures 

(in addition to those listed earlier in Section 12)

Careless storage of chemicals with inadequate labelling. Risk of injury (burns, poisoning)  from incorrect usage.
  • Safe storage.
  • Clear labelling.
Coming into contact with spray mist and/or drift while course is being sprayed. Personal contamination

(see Section 12  above)

  • Be aware when a colleague is on spraying duty.
  • Do not enter any area where spraying is in progress until it is clearly safe to do so.
  • Appropriate PPE should be worn as required to protect against contamination/ poisoning.
  • Strict hygiene must be observed in the presence of all toxic material.
  • A calm day is best for spraying.
  • If spray drift is reaching the machine cab, first try to reduce it by reducing pressure and/or using bigger size jets.
  • Have an enclosed back window on machine cab.
Attempting to remedy a blocked nozzle on a sprayer. May result in poisoning.
  • NEVER carry out this procedure.
  • Obtain replacement nozzle.
Contact with chemical while opening and mixing in preparation for spraying. Personal contamination

(see Section 12 above)

  • Be careful in opening chemical containers and filling tanks.
  • Use proper funnels and measures and avoid splashing.
  • Appropriate PPE must be worn especially rubber gloves (neopropene or nitrile), face shield and overalls.
Handling of acids. Spillage on the skin and splashes to the eyes causing acid burns, eyes irritation, etc.

(see Section 12 above)

  • Adopt care in handling the acid.
  • Strict hygiene must be observed in the presence of all toxic material.
  • Apply water quickly to an acid burn.
  • Use protective clothing such as rubber gloves (neoprene or nitrile), face-shield and overalls.

 

24.LABELLING OF HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS

 

  • Explosive:

May explode if subject to heat, shock or friction.

Precautions: a) Store away from other materials.

b) Always observe recommendations for storage and use.

 

  • Oxidising:

Produces heat on reaction with other materials and creates a fire risk in contact with flammable or combustible materials.

Precautions: a) Store away from other materials.

b) Always observe recommendations for storage and use.

c) Keep container tightly closed.

  • Highly Flammable

A gas solid or liquid with flash point below 0°C and a boiling point below or equal to 35°C.

Precautions: a) Keep away from sources of ignition.

b) Do not smoke.

c) Store in a secure place.

d) Keep container tightly closed.

Flammable

A liquid having a flash point between 21°C and 55°C.

Precautions: a) Keep away from sources of ignition.

b) Do not smoke.

  • Toxic or Very Toxic 

May cause serious or extremely serious health risks or death if inhaled, swallowed or if it penetrates the skin.Precautions: a) Use exhaust ventilation system or full breathing apparatus to prevent exposure to dusts, vapours etc.

b) Wear protective clothing.

c) Do not eat, drink or smoke.

d) Wash hands thoroughly after use.

 

  • Corrosive

May cause chemical burns to skin and eyes, may also be corrosive to certain materials.Precautions: a) Wear protective clothing to avoid contact with skin, eyes and clothing.

b) Provide good ventilation. Specific chemicals may require the use of a protective face-mask.

  • Harmful

May cause limited health risks if inhaled, swallowed or if it penetrates the skin.

Precautions: a) Wear protective clothing to avoid contact with the skin and eyes.

b) Provide good ventilation or use protective face-mask.

c) Do not eat, drink or smoke after use.

  • Irritant

Can cause irritation to skin eyes or breathing system if inhaled.

Precautions: a) Wear protective clothing to avoid contact with skin and eyes.

b) Provide good ventilation or use protective face-mask.

 

  • Dangerous for the Environment

All chemicals labelled as “Dangerous for the Environment” must be disposed of in accordance with current national guidelines. (The suppliers of the chemical should provide this information.)

Precautions: Refer to the chemical data sheet for additional precautions.

 

  • Storage

Chemicals must be stored in accordance with the manufacturers recommendations.  General guidelines for many chemicals include keeping the containers tightly closed in a well-ventilated area with no extremes of temperature.

 

Quantities must be kept to a minimum and stored in correctly labelled containers.  Chemicals that are incompatible with one another must not be stored together in case of breakage, spillage or fire.

 

Where chemical are supplied in glass containers, e.g. bottles, winchesters, etc. suitable safety cages must be used to carry these containers.  The use of safety cans is recommended when transferring flammable or hazardous chemicals from bulk storage.

 

  • How to read a typical label:

25. KITCHEN SAFETY

  • Deep Fat Fryer Hazards

The main hazards associated with the use of deep fat fryers include:

  • faulty thermostats
  • incorrect control of temperature gauge
  • hot oil

The risks from the above hazards include:

  • serious burns
  • fire

Risk Assessment: Medium-High 

 

  • Control Measures

  • The operator must be aware and familiar with the temperature controls of the equipment.
  • Dry food thoroughly before frying, otherwise they will splutter and cause burns
  • Move free standing fryers with great care so as not to jar them and spill oil
  • Ensure staff are aware and trained in the use of correct fire prevention equipment related to burning oil /fat
  • Allow fat to cool before straining
  • Use clean, dry, thick cloths when handling fryers
  • Keep sleeves rolled down at all times when using fat fryer
  • Ensure fat fryer is turned off after use
  • All machinery will be maintained in  safe working order and in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructors
  • Ensure the machine is switched off before cleaning.
  • The Caterer should ensure that defects are reported and remedied immediately
  • Dishwasher Hazards

The main hazards associated with the use of Dishwashers include:

  • Blockage of machines due to irregular cleaning of filters
  • Spillovers due to incorrect amounts of detergent used
  • Chemicals /Leaks

 

The risks from the above hazards include:-

 

  • Spillage of large amounts of water onto the floor, resulting in slips and falls
  • Burns resulting from contact with chemicals

Risk Assessment: Low

  •  Control Measures

  • It is essential that operators are trained in the correct use of this equipment and given appropriate supervision when operating or cleaning the equipment.
  • Operators must be made aware of the hazards associated with cleaning chemicals (see material Data Sheets which must be obtained for all cleaning chemicals)
  • Faults in the machine must be reported to the Caterer and action taken immediately.
  • The Golf Club will ensure that the machine is earthed
  • Salamanders Hazards

The main hazards associated with the use of salamanders include:

  • Very hot salamander bars with risk of serious burns

Risk Assessment: Medium

  • Control Measures

  • It is essential that operators are trained in the correct use of this equipment and given appropriate supervision when operating or cleaning the equipment.
  • Operators must be made aware of the hazards associated with cleaning chemicals (see material Data Sheets which must be obtained for all cleaning chemicals)
  • Operators must take care when moving foods from all salamanders
  •  Always use thongs for handling and turning grilled foods
  • Salamanders must be kept free from fat at all times
  • Salamanders should be switched off when not in use
  • Only trained persons should clean the salamander
  • Ensure the salamander is switched off and cold before cleaning
  • All machinery will be maintained in  safe working order and in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructors
  • The Caterer should ensure that defects are reported and remedied immediately
  • Water Boilers Hazards

The main hazards associated with the use of Water Boilers include:

  • Faulty Wiring
  • Faulty Temperature Controls
  • Drain off tap left open
  • Standing directly over hot boiler when lid is lifted
  • Boiling water and escaping steam

The risks from the above hazards include:-

  • serious burns and scalding
  • Slipping and Falling
  • Electrical shock

Risk Assessment: Low

  • Control Measures

Kitchen staff must:

  • Ensure the boiler is sufficiently filled with water
  • Ensure the correct temperature is set
  • Ensure drain off Tap is closed
  • Ensure the Boiler is placed in a stable position
  • Ensure the power supply is isolated when cleaning
  • All Boilers will be maintained in safe working order and in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructors
  • The Caterer should ensure that defects are reported and remedied immediately
  • It is essential that operators are trained in the correct use of this equipment and given appropriate supervision when operating or cleaning the equipment.
  • Operators must be made aware of the hazards associated with cleaning chemicals (see material Data Sheets which must be obtained for all cleaning chemicals)
  • Bain Maries Hazards

The main hazards associated with the use of Bain Maries include:

  • Bain Maries allowed to burn dry
  • Drain off Tap left open
  • Faulty Wiring

 

The risks from the above hazards include:

  • Electric Shock
  • Scalds and Burns

Risk Assessment: Low

  • Control Measures

  • Ensure connections to plug are secure
  • Ensure the Bain Marie is never allowed to run dry
  • Ensure side doors are secure
  • (If mobile) all casters should be regularly cleaned, oiled and maintained
  • (If mobile) locking system on casters working
  • Ensure equipment is properly earthed
  • Ensure power supply is isolated before cleaning
  • Ensure fat fryer is turned off after use
  • All machinery will be maintained in safe working order and in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructors
  • The Caterer should ensure that defects are reported and remedied immediately
  • It is essential that operators are trained in the correct use of this equipment and given appropriate supervision when operating or cleaning the equipment.
  • Operators must be made aware of the hazards associated with cleaning chemicals (see material Data Sheets which must be obtained for all cleaning chemicals)
  • Ranges /Cookers   Hazards

The main hazards associated with the use of Ranges and Cookers include:

  • Leakage of Gas (pilot lights not working properly)
  • Control knobs missing on Cookers
  • Thermostat not working correctly
  • Naked flames–Fire

The risks from the above hazards include:

  • serious burns / scalding
  • fire

Risk Assessment: Medium

 

 

  • Control Measures

  • Oven doors should not be slammed as it is liable to cause damage
  • Ensure equipment is properly earthed
  • Ensure pilot lights are switched on and working
  • When ranges/cookers are not in use ensure that all gas is switched off at mains
  • Staff should be made aware of Gas shut-off point in the event of fire
  • In case of extreme dirt or grease being baked onto the range/ cooker a caustic jelly may be used. Plastic /Rubber gloves and safety goggles must be used and thorough rinsing must take place afterwards
  • All machinery will be maintained in  safe working order and in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructors
  • The Caterer should ensure that defects are reported and remedied immediately
  • It is essential that operators are trained in the correct use of this equipment and given appropriate supervision when operating or cleaning the equipment.
  • Operators must be made aware of the hazards associated with cleaning chemicals (see material Data Sheets which must be obtained for all cleaning chemicals)

 

Safety Risk Assessment- Members and Visitors

 

The safety risk to members, visitors and guests fall into two categories- (1 & 2) those playing golf and bowling, and (3) those using Clubhouse facilities.

 

(1) The Course

 

Hazard

The highest risk for those on the course is the likelihood of being hit by a golf ball.

 

Risk 

Both serious and Minor Injury

The likelihood of injury to a player is considered low based on historic record.

 

Control Measures

The various safety notices around the Course and the Rules of Golf requiring members and visiting golfers to shout ’fore’ in the event of hitting a stray ball. These importance of playing safely is also highlighted to members regularly through the Club Newsletter.

 

(2) Bowling 

The risks in playing Bowling are considered low.

 

(3) Clubhouse

 

Hazard

The highest risk to those in the Clubhouse is (1) a fire and (2) trip or fall (3) coming into contact with electricity in an area where there is water – showers

 

Risk 

Both serious and minor Injury

The likelihood of injury is considered low based on historic record.

 

Control Measures

The various safety notices around the Clubhouse and Fire safety Plan.